21 May 2021 5pm – Late

Enjoy LightNight at Tate Liverpool with free access to the galleries including and new collection displays and a late night view of the Liverpool Biennial.

Take part in a Buggy Walk, a specially formulated tour for young families and our Ideas Depot display featuring artworks curated by children for children.

Enjoy special LightNight only discounts on children’s activity books in the shop.

Shop and café will be open serving food until 20:00

Age guidance: Open to all with Buggy Walk aimed at 5 and under

The history of the Port of Liverpool echoes other histories of bodies – in labour, in motion and in struggle. Transforming the former Dock Traffic Office, David Zink Yi’s video installation Horror Vacui (2009) emphasises the role of rituals in the production of music, operating as an extended picture without beginning or end.

This exhibition will run until 27th June.

Liverpool Biennial 2021 explores notions of the body. Drawing on non-Western ways of thinking, the 11th edition challenges an understanding of the individual as a defined, self-sufficient entity. The body is instead seen as a fluid organism that is continuously shaped by and shaping its environment. A plethora of artistic practices inform this edition: many of the artworks include sound, shun direct representation, de-stabilise gender categories or look at intense forms of contact. Liverpool, and its maritime history as a point of global contact and circulation, provides the perfect ecosystem to situate these enquiries.

Audience: Specifically aimed at adults but is family friendly

Image credit: David Zink Yi, Horror Vacui (film still), 2009. Courtesy the artist.

Take a taxi ride into an alternate world within the city of Liverpool, where the Cumbian beat of Latin American music intersects with primordial forces.

You can experience Erick Beltrán’s Superposition (2021) by booking a special ComCab Taxis on 0151 298 2222 (normal phone and taxi rates apply). Available throughout Liverpool Biennial, the full Superposition commission, combining lights and music alongside the graphic designs, can be experienced across 5 taxis, while on display across the tip-seats of an additional 30 taxis are Beltrán’s graphic designs, complete with QR codes providing access to the accompanying audio.

Celebrate LightNight outside the Museum of Liverpool with Artemis Street Theatre Productions for a playful walkabout of stilts, story and performance under the sea with larger-than-life Octopi Cali and Mari and their rivals the Lionfish all under the watchful eye of the ever-present Captain Barnacle.

Don’t forget to grab a drink or snack from the Museum of Liverpool’s great new outdoor catering truck, meaning you can take in the view whilst enjoying a take away drink and snack.

Audience: Specifically aimed at families with children

Please note that Museum of Liverpool will not be open, and this activity takes place outside.

On LightNight 2021, dot-art and Open Eye Gallery launch a new trail of seven art works, sited along the Baltic Corridor from Wapping Dock to Bold Street, produced by internationally renowned artist Andrew Merritt of Something & Son. Andrew has transformed seven small pieces of public infrastructure (such as billboard, drainage system, vent systems), to make them useful for other species.

Join us for an online discussion to hear the team behind the Heavy Gardening art trail discuss how art and culture can help build engagement with the green agenda and help communities feel part of the fight against climate change.

Hosted by Lucy Byrne, Managing Director at dot-art, joined by:

Ben Deed – LERC Manager, Merseyside BioBank

Andrew Merritt – Artist & Co-founder of Something & Sons

Dr Juliet Staples – Senior Project Manager, URBAN GreenUP

Andy Yates – Creative Producer, Open Eye Gallery

The Heavy Gardening art trail forms part of the wider EU funded Horizon 2020 URBAN GreenUP project currently taking place in Liverpool. dot-art, Open Eye Gallery and First Take were commissioned to deliver the art element of the project.

Image credit: Andrew Merritt

Activity Packs

Over the next two years Open Eye Gallery is working with a range of partners to develop a programme with a focus on climate change. To complement our online LightNight events, which explore how we can engage with the green agenda through art, we’ve created ‘Grow-at-Home’ activity packs. The packs contain native wildflower seeds, photo challenges and projects by local artists and organisations engaging with the green agenda and a small number are available to collect and take home from the gallery on LightNight.

If you are taking part in LightNight’s online offer from home, you can order an activity pack to be posted to you. To order, email sorcha@openeye.org.uk by 13th May to receive on time for LightNight.

Audience: Specifically aimed at adults but is family friendly

Grow-at-Home with Open Eye Gallery. Over the next two years we are working with a range of partners to develop a programme with a focus on climate change. To complement our LightNight events, which explore how we can engage with the green agenda through art, we’ve created ‘Grow-at-Home’ activity packs.

The packs contain native wildflower seeds, photo challenges and projects by local artists and movements engaging with the green agenda and are available to collect and take home from the gallery on LightNight. Pick up a pack and enjoy a  late night opening of our current exhibition – Liverpool Biennial 2021: The Stomach and the Port.

About the Liverpool Biennial exhibition:

In the downstairs gallery, Zineb Sedira’s works, from her Sugar Routes (2013) series, recount the history of transoceanic slavery and forced migration, the triangular trade routes of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and the continued trade of sugar across the Atlantic for mass consumption.

Exhibited in the upstairs gallery, Alberta Whittle’s film, between a whisper and a cry (2019), also reflects upon these oceanic routes and worldview, hinging on memory, labour and the afterlives of colonialism in our contemporary world.

If you are taking part in LightNight’s online offer from home, you can order an activity pack to be posted to you. To order, email sorcha@openeye.org.uk by 13th May to receive on time for LightNight.

Audience: Specifically aimed at adults but is family friendly

Image credit: Zineb Sedira Sugar Routes I 2013

No booking required, but please note all LightNight venues have limited capacities and you may need to queue to help us adhere to safety guidelines. Read more

Take a taxi ride into an alternate world within the city of Liverpool, where the Cumbian beat of Latin American music intersects with primordial forces.

You can experience Erick Beltrán’s Superposition (2021) by booking a special ComCab Taxis on 0151 298 2222 (normal phone and taxi rates apply). Available throughout Liverpool Biennial, the full Superposition commission, combining lights and music alongside the graphic designs, can be experienced across 5 taxis, while on display across the tip-seats of an additional 30 taxis are Beltrán’s graphic designs, complete with QR codes providing access to the accompanying audio.

 

Want to have your lyrics as part of the Song Machine? Tweet up to 6 words @Stealingsheep #playis

Audience members can send up to six words that will be fed to the Song Machine and processed into a new composition performed live at the British Music Experience on the 21 May 2021.

Live performance at 21:00 on LightNight

Limited tickets are available for some lucky audience members to watch the performance live at British Music Experience!

Stealing Sheep are collaborating with visual artist Amy Cadwallder on Song Machine. Amy is producing the live light art visuals that everyone can experience, either via the live stream or live in the venue. Amy’s work is in video and installation, taking recordings of lights and shiny reflective objects and distorts them into sequences of motion and colour. The video content consists of cutting out and pairing different segments into new patterns, creating repetitive visuals for the viewer to watch.

Tickets for the live performance at the British Music Experience are very limited due to government restrictions and standard covid safety measures are in place. The building and bar is open from 20:00, with performance starting at 21:00. The event takes place in the stage area, and museum galleries remain closed.

Booking is essential.

Livestream

Everyone can watch Song Machine as a Youtube broadcast on LightNight at 21:00, or you can catch the recording later in the evening.

BSL interpretation will be offered by Andy Higgins to support the performance.

Watch live on LightNight

How does sound, noise, and music contribute to your experience of the city, and your wellbeing?

Inspired by Anna Lockwood and Hildegard Westerkamp, a sound walk is a chance to explore the sounds in the urban and natural environment, and experience how they connect with your senses. The route will contain a variety of acoustic spaces, sculpture, and the waterfront with plenty of opportunities to playfully listen to the surrounding activity.

Hosted by Rory Ballantyne. Limited spaces available due to current limits to public gathering. Booking essential.

Book tickets for the 17:00 – 18:00 walk here
Book tickets for the 18:00 – 19:00 walk here

Audience: Specifically aimed at adults but is family friendly

Get involved in free creative workshops in the Clore Learning Studio. Taking inspiration from Ugo Rondinone’s colourful outdoor sculpture Liverpool Mountain, play with different materials to create your own balancing structures!

Led by Debbie Goldsmith and suitable for all ages.

Create your own pom pom in the Tate café to take away! You can wear it, hang it on a bag or simply play with it. Pom poms are fun, easy to make and suitable for all ages.

Head to the Wolfson Gallery for a special performance of Tony Conrad’s audio-visual meditation.

Pairing hypnotic film loops with droning strings, this is a rare chance to see a pioneering work of minimalist cinema and sound.

Tony Conrad (1940–2016) is a pivotal figure in contemporary culture. His multi-faceted contributions have influenced and redefined music, filmmaking, minimalism, performance, video and conceptual art.

Supported by the Estate of Tony Conrad, Greene Naftali, New York, Tate Americas Foundation and a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Experience the gallery after hours with delicious street food in the café, live music from Liverpool Guitar Society, workshops and a special presentation of work by Tony Conrad (1940–2016).

Food served until 21:00, last orders at 20:45. Last orders at the bar 21:40.

Tate Collection gallery, first floor and Op Art in Focus, second floor are open until 21:00.

 

Pom Pom Pom (family friendly) 17:30 — 19:30

Create your own pom pom in the café to take away! You can wear it, hang it on a bag or simply play with it. Pom poms are fun, easy to make and suitable for all ages.

 

Mega Models! (family friendly) 18:00 — 20:00

Get involved in free creative workshops in the Clore Learning Studio. Taking inspiration from Ugo Rondinone’s colourful outdoor sculpture Liverpool Mountain, play with different materials to create your own balancing structures! Led by Debbie Goldsmith and suitable for all ages.

 

Tony Conrad 10 Years on the Infinite Plain 19:00 — 20:30

Head to the Wolfson Gallery for a special performance of Tony Conrad’s audio-visual meditation. Pairing hypnotic film loops with droning strings, this is a rare chance to see a pioneering work of minimalist cinema and sound. Tony Conrad (1940–2016) is a pivotal figure in contemporary culture. His multi-faceted contributions have influenced and redefined music, filmmaking, minimalism, performance, video and conceptual art.

Supported by the Estate of Tony Conrad, Greene Naftali, New York, Tate Americas Foundation and a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Award-winning RIBA Chartered Practice Studio MUTT bring the elaborate writings of Sir John Soane to life with In Character, an exhibition where ornament, colour and form are brought together to explore the ways in which architecture can communicate to us.

Permutations is a new musical work by Freya Waley-Cohen, performed by Tamsin Waley-Cohen, and an architectural installation by Finbarr O’Dempsey and Andrew Skulina.

It was created on an Open Space Residency at Aldeburgh Music because the artists wanted to create a way for listeners to involve themselves in harmony and counterpoint, whilst using the powerful relationship between architecture and music to give autonomy over the performance ritual to listeners. The performance and its architectural setting were developed simultaneously and in close collaboration, each acting as a muse for the other.

The 18-minute composition is written for six recorded violin parts. The architectural setting is a set of six movable chambers, each of which houses one of the six violin parts. While adjusting the level of resonance in a chamber by rotating the doors, the listener can transform the level of acoustic enclosure, to single out one or two parts at any given time or to experience the full ensemble in counterpoint. Through interaction with the chambers, listeners will be able to explore the new work of music from the inside out. Each audience member can create their own ritual by the path they choose to take through the space.

Kinship looks at how women are using photography to reflect upon their sense of kin.

All six artists in this exhibition are women, and the projects collected together seek to uncover the ways people build close relationships amongst each other that feel like family. This ‘kin’ can be relations, partners, or close friends, tracing the way that our understanding of family and relationships are in flux.

Alongside the exhibition anyone is welcome to have their portrait taken as part of a ‘family’ with free drop in Polaroid portraits, reflecting on the ritual of family portraits and how we present ourselves as a group. You can take your free polaroid portrait home with you.

The exhibition features Pixy Liao, Momo Okabe, Margaret Mitchell, Lydia Goldblatt, Jenny Lewis, and Johanna Heldebro. Open Eye Gallery offers free tea and coffee on a ‘help-yourself’ basis.

Local playwriting group Lantern Writers perform short plays reflecting rituals as the theatre of our lives; bridging the past and present. 15+

lanternwriters.org

Uncover how early societies have been rediscovered by archaeologists and explore the belief systems of Merseyside’s earliest people through the scant symbols and structures they left behind. Piece together the rhythm of the daily lives of prehistoric people, their rituals and their beliefs.

Glimpse into the lives of the first people to settle here and gain some understanding of a society and culture far removed from our own at this series of talks. Connect with a people who did not see the divide between the supernatural and natural worlds as we do today.

Enjoy special events and a late opening of the museum’s ground floor galleries until 22:00, and Rhythms of the Candomblé Orixás outside on the steps at 21:00 -22:00.

 

Early Settlers and the Calderstones 17:30, 18:30 & 20:30

Glimpse into the lives of the first people to settle here and gain some understanding of a society and culture far removed from our own at this series of talks. Connect with a people who did not see the divide between the supernatural and natural worlds as we do today.

 

Ron Cowell, Curator of Prehistoric Archaeology 18:00, 19:30 & 21:00

Uncover how early societies have been rediscovered by archaeologists and explore the belief systems of Merseyside’s earliest people through the scant symbols and structures they left behind. Piece together the rhythm of the daily lives of prehistoric people, their rituals and their beliefs.

 

Rituals as the Theatre of our Lives (family friendly) 20:30 — 21:30

Local playwriting group Lantern Writers perform short plays reflecting rituals as the theatre of our lives; bridging the past and present. 15+

 

Rhythms of the Candomblé Orixás (family friendly) Museum of Liverpool Steps, Pier Head 21:00 — 22:00

A show-stopping dusk performance from samba reggae drumming band Batala Mersey. Performed by over 30 drummers in traditional costume as they pay homage to the spiritual significance of the band’s Afro-Brazilian roots and tell the story of three orixás. 3 x 20min ritualistic percussive routines.

Take a terrible terror tour, featuring tales of murders, mysteries and stories of suspense. Discover what links Sherlock Holmes, Spring-heeled Jack and Dr Crippen have to Liverpool.

Tickets are limited and must be booked in advance via liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/lightnight

The Old Dock experience has a new tour guide just for LightNight. Look out for him he’s “dead old”!

Take a tour of the world’s first commercial enclosed wet dock with expert guides. Discover this revolutionary dock and see the bed of the Pool, the creek that gave Liverpool its name.

Tickets are limited and must be booked in advance here

Full details of all the events across National Museum Liverpool venues can be found at liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/lightnight

Explore the ground and 1st floor galleries of Merseyside Maritime Museum and enjoy a bite at the Quayside Café until 22:00.

 

Creepy Crafts (family friendly) 17:00 — 20:00

Creepy crafts for children with stories of local folklore legend Spring-Heeled Jack and Fearsome Facepainting.

 

Darkness on LightNight (family friendly) 17:00 — 22:00

A night of suspense, intrigue and local historical folklore.

 

Spooky Stories (family friendly) 17:15, 18:00 & 18:45

Hear stories of smugglers with Mother Redcap.

 

Old Dock Experience (family friendly) 17:30 & 19:00

Take a tour of the world’s first commercial enclosed wet dock with expert guides.

Discover this revolutionary dock and see the bed of the Pool, the creek that gave Liverpool its name. Please note the tours are now sold out. 

 

Terrible Tours 18:00, 19:00 & 20:00

Featuring tales of murders, mysteries and stories of suspense! Discover what links Sherlock Holmes, Spring-Heeled Jack and Dr Crippen have to Liverpool…

Tickets are limited and must be booked in advance via liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/lightnight

 

Ghostly Goings-On 18:30, 19:30 & 20:30

Join the Ghostly Goings-On tour guide on a journey through real-life spooky tales and creepy coincidences in the Titanic and Liverpool: The Untold Story exhibition.

In homage to the rich variety of festivals on offer throughout the UK the BME creates an immersive walk-through experience looking at how ‘the festival’ has become embedded within our culture as a rite of passage.

Be witness to a visual and audio soundscape that will take you on a journey through the decades from the sub-culture youths of the sixties and seventies to now and witness the evolution of the ‘festival’ from its folk and rock origins to the more mainstream popular music of the nineties and noughties.

From The Who and David Bowie to Gorillaz the spectacle of the festival will be represented on BME’s own mainstage, celebrating headlining acts throughout the decades.

See a show stopping dusk drumming performance from Samba Reggae drumming band Batala Mersey on the newly opened steps of the Museum of Liverpool at the Pier Head.

The story of three Brazilian Orishas will form the basis of three short ritualistic percussive routines, representing the human form of their Candomble spirit in the Yoruba identity. Each twenty minute performance has been designed to allude to the ritualistic rhythms and moves of the particular Orisha it represents, bringing about a unique mood and spiritual feel to each of the individual performances.

Bring family and friends to watch live Samba Reggae music performed by over 30 drummers wearing traditional costume, and reflect on and pay homage to the spiritual significance of its Afro-Brazilian roots.

Sleeping In The Middle is a new project seeking to intertwine poetry and photography.

In 2015, photographer AJ Wilkinson faced the ending of a 25 year relationship. To communicate some of the sense of loss he felt and the heightened emotional states he encountered, he made photographs. A year later, AJ and Pauline Rowe (Open Eye Gallery’s Writer in Residence) began a collaboration, using the images as a starting point. Together, they have woven original poetry and images around each other, creating a moving synthesis of words and image.

The poems borrow lines from William Blake, Emily Dickinson and Thomas Wyatt: these lines interlace with Pauline’s, carrying with them the charge of the original poems they are sampled from. The photographs will be projected on to large screens, with recordings of Pauline’s poetry playing out loud through the gallery space. Here, spoken word does not seek to explain or contextualise the images, but instead offer a more immersive way of approaching how it feels to lose someone close.

Liverpool Carnival Company transforms the Albert Dock into a mini carnival of music, dance and costume exploring the meeting of technology and culture looking to the future. Join in! What will you choose; android, or carnival feathers and glitter?

Find yourself transformed in a series of projected kaleidoscopic patterns. This immersive light and sound installation is responsive to the presence of visitors of all ages, creating sounds and moving patterns based on your actions.

Singing Mirror is suited for all the family to explore and also presents the chance to get a sneak peek of the wonderful displays at the British Music Experience for free. The Star Café will be serving food and drinks throughout the night, as well as hosting live music from the in-house band.

Located opposite the Mersey Ferry terminal, in the Cunard building, The British Music Experience is a dedicated exhibition to the history of British Music.

Take a tour of Liverpool’s historic Old Dock – the world’s first commercial enclosed wet dock – with our expert guides. Discover how this revolutionary dock was key to Liverpool’s development and see the bed of the Pool, the creek that gave Liverpool its name, under the streets of Liverpool One!

Tickets are limited and must be booked in advance via 0151 478 4499.

Explore exhibitions looking at the port of Liverpool, with highlights including Black Salt: Britain’s Black Sailors and Lusitania: life, loss, legacy.

Special live performances from the Liverpool Guitar Society will take place at intervals throughout the evening in front of the Titanic and Liverpool: The untold story exhibition on the 2nd floor.

World Museum, the Museum of Liverpool and Walker Art Gallery are also open for LightNight, find out what’s on here.

A special performance by young people from YULA drama of Totally Over You, a sparky comedy written by contemporary British playwright Mark Ravenhill.

This exhibition will no longer be open late due to the special LightNight event Sleeping in the Middle.

What is it that we’re sharing when we share images online?  Worldwide, we post over three billion images on social media every day. Although the act of snapping and sharing photos seems casual, it drastically shapes the way we understand ourselves, each other, and cultures we are less familiar with.

Snapshot to WeChat: A Migration of Identity looks at photographs taken by ordinary people in China and considers how the everyday act of taking photos shapes our identity.  Anthropologist Xinyuan Wang explores photos posted by people on WeChat, China’s hugely popular social media platform.   Thomas Sauvin presents ‘Beijing Silvermine’, an archive of photographs sourced from thousands of rolls of used film bought from a recycling plant outside Beijing.

Teresa Eng presents her Self/ Portrait series, in which she asks young people in China and Liverpool to show her one of their selfies and presents it next to a new portrait she has taken.   China has seen an unprecedented migration from rural to urban living to support a rapidly expanding economy.

As part of Liverpool 2018’s China Dream season, Snapshot to WeChat examines the modern role of photography and casts some light on life in a rapidly transforming culture.

CPC Music: Cressington String Orchestra perform live for two 20 minute sets. CPC stands for ‘Child – Parent – Community’.

Music can build bridges across generations and social boundaries; here, in the presence of the community-built Paper Bridge, the strings of instruments are transformed into music that can bridge our souls.

Take part in an exciting new collaboration between Tate Liverpool, ARUP, Open Eye Gallery and RIBA which will see schools, families, artists and you come together to create a 15-metre paper bridge.

Write down an aspiration for the future – a transformation you wish to see in the world or in yourself – before adding your paper to the finished structure.

This interactive work by Jayson Haebich creates a mesmerising effect of colour and light, taking the pure white light from a laser and breaking it apart into millions of its component colours, which are then scattered around to create a dazzling array of colour and light.

RIBA North is the Royal Institute of British Architects’ national architecture centre.

It Will Never Work is an unplanned trip from Madchester to Brexit via Easyjet and driverless cars, with a quick history of unorthodox thinking and a few buildings along the way.  In their first 25 years, Urban Splash have won over 40 RIBA Awards.

These awards cross the spectrum from Small Projects to the Stirling Prize Shortlist and cover refurbishment and new-build on residential, leisure and commercial schemes. Special awards acknowledge the company’s commitment to Sustainability, Housing and Conservation.

Urban Splash profess to have started without a plan, purposefully ignoring advice and routinely rejecting accepted development processes. At every step ‘it will never work’ has been a call to action rather than a discouragement.

In this exhibition, explore the RIBA Award-winning projects in the context they were created and against the specific challenges and opportunities of the day.

We will try to understand what, in the Urban Splash approach, connects all these projects and cuts across the immediate context to form a consistent body of work and essential ethos.

Hear from one of the founders of Urban Splash as they give a guided tour of the exhibition telling the wider story of the award-winning projects that are highlighted.  It Will Never Work is an unplanned trip from Madchester to Brexit via Easyjet and driverless cars, with a quick history of unorthodox thinking and a few buildings along the way.

Urban Splash profess to have started without a plan, purposefully ignoring advice and routinely rejecting accepted development processes. At every step ‘it will never work’ has been a call to action rather than a discouragement.

In this exhibition we explore RIBA Award-winning projects, in the context they were created and against the specific challenges and opportunities of the day.

Book your free place via architecture.com/lightnight2018

Come and join in the fun with Tate Liverpool’s Collective’s who will lead a hands-on workshop making shakers that you can wear and move with, inspired by new exhibition Utupya! You’ll then be encouraged to wear and shake them around the gallery! The top floor gallery has been transformed by Brazilian collective OPAVIVARÁ! into an immersive environment featuring playful and interactive installations.

Visitors are invited to become an active part of the artwork by sharing ideas, cultures and experiences within the communal spaces.  Enjoy chatting with friends in a giant colourful hammock, made by stitching together several individual hammocks, or relax over a cup of herbal tea at the free tea station – it’s the perfect place to enjoy views of the waterfront whilst also becoming part of a piece of socially engaged art.

The Brazilian theme will run throughout the evening; enjoy music inspired by the Rio Carnival, a delicious menu of Brazilian delicacies and cocktails in the café and the opportunity to be transported straight to Brazil by the impressive Dream Screen experience!

Welcome to Headstrung’s latest expedition into the forgotten corners of the animal kingdom. This interactive puppetry performance follows on from our previous show “The Cryptid Petting Zoo”.

The Cockatrice is a creature of transformation, created when a chicken’s egg is hatched beneath a toad. Here we explain the truth behind the legend.

This show is for a small audience; allowing an intimate experience and one to one interaction with both puppet and performers. Besides, we can’t let too many people know the secret – or everyone will want one! Suitable for brave children and curious adults only. You have been warned!

17:30 — 17:45

18:00 — 18:15

18:30 — 18:45

19:00 — 19:15

Join ROOT-ed and Tate Collective Producers in this drop-in debate discussing how can we transform the art world to become more inclusive.

With speakers presenting their experiences on the subject and an opportunity for guests to pose questions and join in the debate.

From the Big Bang to mobile-obsessed humans, Tmesis Theatre take you on a crazily transformative, twenty minute, fast-paced journey of our evolution. Using their trademark quirky, comic and entertaining physical style, this new street piece is accompanied by a journey through live music, from the didgeridoo to the digital! Based here in Liverpool, Tmesis have toured their award-winning physical theatre productions nationally and internationally for the past 14 years.

Takes place outside Dr Martin Luther King Jr Building at Albert Dock.

This event is supported by Albert Dock Liverpool.

Directed by Elinor Randle
Performers: Eleni Edipidi,  Yasmine Goulden, Chris Murray, Charles Sandford and Guy Shread
Music Barry Han and Meike Holzmann
Designed by Stephanie O Hara
Produced by Claire Bigley

Performances last 20 minutes.

Dung beetles co-existed with dinosaurs over a hundred million years ago, probably munching their droppings. They were the scarabs worshipped by ancient Egyptians as symbols of reincarnation.

Cleaners and recyclers, essential to life on earth, these beetles transform dung into nourishment, aerating the soil and countering climate change by burying carbon.   Two dung beetles roam the streets of Liverpool accompanied by ethereal music, sharing stories with the public, posing questions about life and dung. They may ask for help  – at night they steer their course by the Milky Way, but this will be hard in a city drowned in light pollution. They also have to make sure no other creature steals their booty – dung is a precious and sought-after resource. Is there much difference between us and them? In the great cosmic dance, are we all equal?

Insects are so often invisible to humans, especially in cities, yet they are part of the rich fabric of life on which we all depend, linking past and present, earth and universe.  We would do well to learn from them.  ‘The Dung Beetles’ Cosmic Journey’ is a parable of hope; humans are part of life – and life is transformation.

terabac.co.uk